Not enough time to workout?

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Without a doubt, one of the most common reasons people cite for their lack of exercise is not having enough time.  Between work, school and family life, trying to fit an exercise routine into a busy schedule can seem like a tough task.  Today, I’m going to show you how to fit an effective exercise program into a busy schedule in two simple steps:

Step 1) Stick to the basics

The human body is only capable of a finite number of movement patterns.  Just about anything you do on a day to day basis can be broken down into a combination of the following patterns:

-Squat
-Hinge
-Push
-Pull
-Stabilize

Everything you do with your body- Walking, running, jumping, kayaking, swimming, golfing, etc. can be broken down in a series and a combination of these patterns.  An exercise routine built around these foundation movement patterns will target all major muscle groups and avoid an incredible amount of time wasted in the gym.   Let’s take a deeper look into each of these patterns:

-Squat:
We squat all the time.  We squat when we stand up out of our chairs and when we go up and down steps we’re actually doing a series of single-leg squats.  The primary muscles involved with squatting include the quadriceps (the front of your thigh) and hip muscles such as the glutes.  A great example of an exercise which targets this pattern is a goblet squat, as shown below:

goblet

-Hinge:
Hinging at the hips is movement pattern that becomes very weak, uncoordinated and restricted as we age and find ourselves in a sedentary lifestyle.  Instead of hinging at the hips to pick things up, our lack of mobility and strength causes us to try to lift things with our back and maintain poor posture, leading to one of the most common afflictions in western society: lower back pain.   The muscles involved with hinging consist of the large hip muscles, primarily the glutes and hamstrings.  Hinge exercises include any type of hip bridge or deadlift variation:

hip_bridgedeadlift

-Pushing:
From lifting yourself up out of bed to throwing a chest pass in basketball, pushing movements can be found throughout our days outside of the gym.  These tend to be the most commonly-performed patterns of movement, as just about anybody who has spent any time in a gym has done some form of push-up, chest press, bench press, military press, etc.  The muscles involved here include the chest, triceps, and shoulders:

pushup

-Pulling:
This is an all-too-often neglected aspect of fitness training.  As I said above, there aren’t many people who haven’t done their fair share of pushing in their gym-going life.  The opposite is true for pulling.  The muscles of the upper back such as the lats, rhomboids and middle and lower traps often become weak and inactive for two reasons: We sit at a desk all day long, which creates a shortening of the muscles on the front side of your body and a weakening of the muscles on the back side, and then when we go to the gym we tend to make matters worse by doing a bunch of presses and not enough pulls.   This also helps lead to lower back pain, shoulder impingement and other various issues that can be avoided. Any variation of rows, pulldowns, and pull-ups can be used to improve this pattern:
bent row

-Stabilize:
This concentrates on all things core-related.  The musculature of your mid-section is meant to stabilize your spine and resist excessive flexion, extension, lateral flexion, and rotation.  I’ve written extensively about those topics here, here, here and here.  The key to having a healthy, pain-free back is training your core to be strong and durable through stabilization techniques as described in the links listed.

It really is this simple.  If your workout has representation of each of the movement patterns listed above, you have yourself a very effective, full body workout.  Now that you know what to do, let’s talk about timing.

Step 2) Don’t waste time

We now know that you do not need a long list of exercises to hit all of your major muscle groups.  To expedite your workouts further, the next step is to cut down on rest.  Through the process of super-setting or circuit training, you can cut your workout time down tremendously.  A super-set is when you bounce back and forth between two exercises until you have completed the desired number of sets of each.  Let’s take the bench press and the leg curl as an example.  A typical workout might consist of doing one set of 10 reps on the bench, sitting and resting for say, 2 minutes, then doing a 2nd set of 10, resting, and a final 3rd set of ten before moving on to the leg curl.  Instead, you should use replace those 2 minutes of rest with a set of leg curls.  Go from bench press to leg curl, back to bench press until you’ve completed all 3 sets of each exercise.   You can super-set any two exercises together, but it is recommended that you use non-competing muscle groups.  This is important for 2 reasons.  For one, by super-setting an upper body exercise with a lower body exercise, you ensure that you’ll get the greatest strength benefit possible from each, without allowing muscular fatigue to be your limiting factor.  Another important, often over-looked benefit of this method is the cardiovascular effect.  When you perform an upper body exercise, your heart works to pump blood towards the muscles which are working.  When you turn around and immediately start working your lower body, your heart has to work even harder to push the blood from your upper to your lower body.  This has tremendous benefits for your cardiovascular system.  Circuit training is the exact same idea, except that you’re using more than 2 exercises.

A sample workout might look like this, using both of the steps listed above:

A1) Goblet Squat
A2) Push-Up

B1) Deadlift
B2) Dumbbell Row

C1) Plank
C2) Birddog
C3) Side Plank

A1 and A2 are super-set together, as are B1 and B2, while the C group is a core circuit.  Simple, effective, and incredibly time-efficient.

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Break Through Your Barriers

By now, just about everyone realizes that exercise is important.  Research has shown that regular physical activity can:

-Decrease likelihood of cardiovascular disease
-Improve mental focus and mood
-Improve test scores in school
-Reduce symptoms of depression
-Reduce risk of falls and bone breaks among senior citizens
-Improve body composition, reduce excess weight
-Reduce symptoms of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid and osteoarthritis
Among many others.

This is now news to most people.  So why then do several studies, show that so few Americans exercise?  We have more access to better equipment than ever before, and the awareness of the risks of inactivity are better known than ever before…yet a recent poll done by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows that about 80% of Americans do not get the recommended amount of physical activity.  How can something that has such clear benefits become so rare in our society full of rising health care costs and increasing rates of disease?

Over the last 10 years or so of working in the fitness industry, I’ve encountered several reasons people will cite for not exercising regularly, but a few stick out as the most common.  These are the most common Barriers to Exercise that seem to pop up quite often:

-Lack of Time
-Lack of Energybreakthrough-img
-Lack of Motivation
-Fear of Getting Hurt
-Intimidation or General dislike for physical activity

If you fall into the category of someone who identities with one or more of these barriers, trust me when I say you are not alone.  All of my most successful clients, people who have lost significant weight and/or have put on impressive amounts of muscle and completely changed their body image, have dealt with at least one of these issues several times throughout their journey.  The key is to not let these barriers beat you.  Find a way to break through each one of these barriers, and you will find a way to create a much happier, healthier version of yourself that you never thought was possible.  I’m going to show you how to break through each one of these barriers over my next several posts, starting with a Lack of Time.

Stay tuned.

Adam